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debian Archives - AWS Managed Services by Anchor

Round ’em up with Jessie

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A new version of the Debian operating system, version 8 (codename “Jessie”) was released over the weekend. Just as we did two years ago with Wheezy, we are now immediately offering Debian Jessie as an option for new customers. This includes our new OpenStack infrastructure, where Jessie is our recommended option for Managed Operations and Unmanaged instances. If you already have a Debian server with us and would like to upgrade, drop us a line and we’ll be able to advise as to what’s involved to support your stack on Jessie. To find out more about the services we can offer, visit http://www.anchor.com.au/.

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Let us take your breath away with Wheezy!

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A new version of the Debian GNU/Linux operating system, version 7.0 (codename “Wheezy”) has been released today. Thanks to the open and transparent development cycle of Debian, we have been able to work on improving our support for this release ahead of time, and are happy to announce that we now offer our market-leading Anchor Complete support on Debian Wheezy immediately. Aside from the improvements and new software versions shipped with Debian Wheezy, we are also supporting some newer versions of software we like that didn’t make it into the release. When you choose Anchor Complete support with Debian Wheezy, you also get full support for the following: nginx 1.4 with SPDY built in Percona 5.5 (performance-enhanced MySQL fork) PostgreSQL 9.2 with massive performance gains Redis 2.6 with NDS If…

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Automated server updates

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This is going to be a contentious one, but here at Anchor we think automatically applying updates to servers is a Good Thing. It’s definitely not for everyone, but in an environment like ours with hundreds of managed servers it’s the only way you’re going to get things done and get any sleep at night. Sysadmin of note Tom Limoncelli advocates rolling out updates to progressively more machines with prior testing beforehand to mitigate the scope of potential problems (it’s called “one, some, many”). It’s certainly a good strategy for a large number of homogenous computers, but what we’re talking about here is a bit smaller-scale. Specifically, we have customers with servers that we never touch, we call this Anchor Monitor. These customers often have particular environments that they’re better…

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