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connectivity Archives - AWS Managed Services by Anchor

Dual-stack IPv6/IPv4 as standard on new US deployments

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The focus for this post is obviously about our IPv6 deployment plans, but I’d like to take a small detour through our US presence on the way there. Anchor’s networking and automation gurus have been hard at work preparing our new kit over in the US, and the day we go live is fast approaching. In the process we’ve had literally zero personal presence over there, not one plane ticket was bought. That we can get away with this is mostly thanks to two things: Equinix and DRACs (Dell’s remote-management interface). Equinix One of the reasons we went with Equinix is their high level of support, which goes nicely with Anchor’s approach to business. The servers were dropshipped direct to the LA3 datacentre where staff unpacked them and racked them…

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Testing your connectivity

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Recently I blogged about our new IPv4 address allocation. While we don’t need to start using it for a while as we have been conserving IP addresses quite well, and gave ourselves plenty of time before we actually need to use the new allocation, it is a good idea to check that it is accessible to the Internet at large. Our new allocation is from the block 110.0.0.0/8 which was only allocated to the Asia-Pacific regional registry APNIC last November. Prior to it being allocated to APNIC, it would have been in a state affectionately known as “bogon” to network administrators. Bogons are network ranges that aren’t in use, and therefore can be safely ignored by all live networks on the Internet. There have been cases where spammers or other…

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Global connectivity monitoring

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If you manage a network on the Internet, you are committing to providing connectivity to practically the entire world, while only having direct control over your local connectivity. Worse still, you usually only have good visibility into local network conditions, which makes knowing about (as well as investigating and resolving) connectivity problems from other parts of the world a massive pain. Clever people on the Internet, though, have already noticed this problem and are here to help. My network tool of the week is traceroute.org, which offers a huge list of publically-available traceroute servers sorted by country. You give one of these traceroute servers an IP address or hostname, and they’ll show you how they got to it from wherever they are. If the utility of that isn’t immediately obvious……

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