COVID-19 has been an eye-opening experience for many of us. Prior to the current pandemic, many of us, as individuals, had never experienced the impacts of a global health crisis before. The same can very much be said for the business world. Quite simply, many businesses never considered it, nor had a plan in place to survive it.

As a consequence, we’ve seen the devastating toll that COVID-19 has had on some businesses and even entire sectors. According to an analysis by Oxford Economics, McKinsey and McKinsey Global Institute, certain sectors such as manufacturing, accommodation and food services, arts, entertainment and recreation, transportation and warehousing and educational services will take at least 5 years to recover from the impact of COVID-19 and return to pre-pandemic contributions to GDP. There is one industry however, that was impacted by the pandemic in the very opposite way; technology services.

The growth of our digital landscape

With many countries going into varying levels of lockdown, schools and workplaces shutting down their premises, and social distancing enforcement in many facets of our new COVID-safe lives, our reliance on technology has skyrocketed throughout 2020. In 2020, “buy online” searches increased by 50% over 2019, almost doubling during the first wave of the pandemic in March. Looking at statistics from the recent Black Friday sales event gives us a staggering further example of how much our lives have transitioned into the digital world.

In the US, Black Friday online searches increased by 34.13% this year. Even here in Australia, where there is significantly less tradition surrounding the Thanksgiving/Black Friday events, online searches for Black Friday still also increased by 34.39%. Globally, when you compare October 2019 to October 2020, online retail traffic numbers grew by a massive 30%, which accounts for billions of visitors.

Retail isn’t the only sector that now relies on the cloud far more heavily than ever before. Enterprises have also had to move even more of their operations into the cloud to accommodate the sudden need for remote working facilities. With lockdowns occurring all over the world for sometimes unknown lengths of time, businesses have had to quickly adapt to allow employees to continue their roles from their own homes. Likewise, the education sector is another who have had to adapt to providing their resources and services to students remotely. Cloud computing platforms, such as AWS, are the only viable platforms that are set up to handle such vast volumes of data while remaining both reliable and affordable.

Making the transition to online

With such clear growth in the digital sector, it makes sense that businesses who already existed online, or were quick to transition to an online presence at the start of the pandemic, have by far and large had the best chance at surviving. In the early months of the pandemic, many bricks and mortar businesses returned to their innovative roots, finding ways to digitise and mobilise their products and services. Many in the hospitality industry, for example, had to quickly adapt to online ordering and delivery to stay afloat, while many other businesses and sectors transitioned in new and unexpected ways too.

What many of these businesses had in common, was to decide somewhere along the way how to get online quickly, while being mindful of costs and long-term sustainability. When it comes to flexibility, availability and reliability, there really is no competition to cloud computing to be able to consistently deliver all three.

What is AWS Managed Cloud Hosting?

Amazon Web Services has taken over the world as one of the leading public cloud infrastructure providers, offering an abundance of products and services that can greatly assist you in bringing your business presence online.

AWS provides pay-as-you-go infrastructure that allows businesses to scale their IT resources with the business demand. Prior to the proliferation of cloud providers, businesses would turn to smaller localised companies, such as web hosts and software development agencies, to provide them with what they needed. Over recent years, things have greatly progressed as cloud services have become more expansive, integrated and able to cater to more complex business requirements than ever before.

When you first create an account with AWS and open up the console menu for the first time, the expansive nature of the services that they provide becomes very apparent.

Here, you’ll find all of the most expected services such as online storage facilities such as (S3), database hosting (RDS), DNS hosting (Route 53) and computing (EC2). But it doesn’t stop there, other popular services include Lambda, Lightsail and VPC, creating an array of infrastructure options large enough to host any environment. At the time of writing, there are 161 different services on offer in the AWS Management Console, spread out over 26 broader categories.

AWS Cloud Uptake during the Pandemic

Due to the flexible, scalable and highly reliable nature of AWS cloud hosting, the uptake of managed cloud services has continued to rise steadily throughout the pandemic. So far in 2020, AWS has experienced a 29% growth, bringing the total value up to a sizable $10.8bn.

With the help of an accredited and reputable AWS MSP (Managed Service Provider), businesses of all scales are able to digitise their operations quickly and cost-effectively. Whether you’re an SMB in the retail space who needs to provide a reliable platform for customers to find and purchase your goods, or an enterprise level business with thousands of staff members who rely on internal networks to perform their work remotely, AWS provides a vast array of services to cater to every need.

If you’re interested in finding out what AWS cloud hosting could do for your business, please don’t hesitate to get in touch with our expert team for a free consultation.